How to Play Vikinglotto

To play Vikinglotto, select six numbers from 1 to 48 and one Viking number from 1 to 8. The Viking number is drawn from a separate pool, so it can be the same as one of the main numbers in the same draw. You can either play online or buy tickets from authorised retailers in any of the participating countries.

You win prizes by matching your chosen numbers with those drawn. To win the jackpot, you must match all seven. The top two prizes are shared between each of the nine participating countries and the rest of the prize fund is kept separate for each nation. Prize structure can therefore be different depending on where you play. Visit the Prizes page for more information.

Playing online

Play Vikinglotto Online

If you play Vikinglotto online, your ticket will be stored safely and your numbers will be checked automatically. You will be notified immediately if you win a prize and any winnings will be paid into your online account. Follow these steps to play online:

  • Open an online account

    Open an online account with your lottery operator.

  • Deposit Funds

    Deposit funds into your account.

  • Choose Numbers

    Choose six main numbers and one Viking number.

  • Draws number

    Decide how many draws in advance you would like to play.

  • Pay for your ticket

    Confirm your purchase.

Playing at Retailer

Play Vikinglotto via a Retailer

You can also play Vikinglotto by visiting an authorised retailer in one of the nine participating countries. Just follow these steps:

  • Retailer

    Go to the retailer of your choice and fill out a playslip.

  • Choose Numbers

    Choose six main numbers and one Viking number to enter into the draw.

  • Joker Lotto

    Select whether you want to enter the Joker add-on game for an additional stake.

  • Draws number

    Decide how many draws in advance you would like to play.

  • Pay for your ticket

    Pay for your ticket and keep it safe.

Your ticket is the only proof that you have played and it is advised that you sign the back of it. You will need to produce a valid winning ticket to be able to claim a prize.

Players in Finland, Norway and Sweden can register for a player card to play Vikinglotto, whether entering online or through retailers. See the country specific rules further down this page for more information.

Online vs Retailer Play

Online vs Retail Play

What are the benefits of playing Vikinglotto online compared to buying a ticket from a lottery retailer?

  • Convenience

    If you buy tickets from a retailer, you must go to an authorised store during its opening hours. By playing online, you can take part at a time that suits you and from the comfort of your own home.

  • Security

    Online tickets are safely stored in your account. There is always a risk that a physical ticket could be lost, damaged or stolen, preventing you from claiming any prizes you win.

  • Simplicity

    If you play online, your numbers will be checked for you and winnings will be paid into your account automatically. Playing via a retailer generally requires you to check your own ticket and return to an authorised store to collect your prize.

Country icon

Country Specific Rules

Some of the rules of the game, such as ticket prices and the minimum age of entry, can differ depending on where you play. In some countries, you can register for a player card in order to play any lottery games, including Vikinglotto.

Minimum Age

In Estonia and Lithuania, you must be 16 years old to play Vikinglotto, and in all other participating countries you must be at least 18 years old.

Ticket Cut-Off Times

The cut-off for ticket sales is 18:00 CET (19:00 EET) on the day of the draw in all of the participating countries except for Denmark, where it is slightly earlier at 17:55 CET, and Iceland, where sales close at 17:00 CET (16:00 GMT).

In most of the participating countries, ticket sales for future games reopen straight after the draw has taken place at 20:00 CET (21:00 EET). In Finland, sales commence at 21:30 CET (22:30 EET) and in Lithuania they resume at 21:00 CET (22:00 EET).

Cost of Tickets

The table below shows the cost of playing in each country. In Denmark and Lithuania you must play a minimum of two lines. In Lithuania, both lines will have the same main numbers but a different Viking number.

CountryCost per Line
Denmark Denmark 6 kr – minimum two lines
Finland Finland €0.80 + €0.40 for Plus number*
Iceland Iceland 90 kr
Norway Norway 6 kr
Sweden Sweden 10 kr
Estonia Estonia €1.00
Latvia Latvia € 0.80
Lithuania Lithuania €0.75 – minimum two lines
Slovenia Slovenia €1.10

*The Plus number is exclusive to players in Finland

Registering a Player Card

When playing Vikinglotto for the first time in Norway, Finland or Sweden, you can register for a player card, whether playing online or through a retailer (it is mandatory in Norway and Sweden). In each country, you will need to provide proof of identity, personal details and bank details to register. Any prizes you win, including the jackpot, will automatically be paid into your account.

Plus Number

The Plus number is exclusive to players in Finland. For an additional €0.40 stake you will be assigned a randomly generated number between 1 and 30. Shortly after the Vikinglotto draw, a winning Plus number will also be drawn. If you match it with your random number you will multiply any non-jackpot prize you win in the main draw by five times its original value. Up to €1 million can be added to the original value of your prize in this way. If you do not win a prize on the main game but still manage to match the Plus number, you win €5.

Systems

System games give you the opportunity to play multiple number combinations, increasing your chances of winning. To play a system, you choose eight or more numbers and play every possible combination of them as a separate line. The more numbers you include in your system, the more lines that it will generate.

Remember that you must pay for every line you play, so if you play a system game that generates 50 number combinations, you would pay for 50 entries. See the Systems page for more information, including a generator that will show you which number combinations would be created by particular systems.